Titivil
Just a big old house.

Just a big old house.

theatlantic:

Grant Morrison’s Doom Patrol: The Craziest Superhero Story Ever Told

For most superheroes, fighting for truth and justice means fighting for the status quo.  The typical plot: Supervillain(s) attempts to take over the world and/or steal property; superhero(es) stop them.
The journey from disjunction to order is only emphasized by the fact that the heroes are themselves often outsiders in some way. Superman is an immigrant; Batman has a traumatic childhood backstory; the X-Men are policed and persecuted mutants. Yet despite the fact that they are underdogs, the heroes nonetheless fight for the mainstream authorities. Thus superheroes are often fantasies of assimilation—a dream of outsiders being accepted by, or turning into, insiders.
At best, that fantasy offers a promise of acceptance to everyone, making for an inclusive vision of the American dream. At worst, superheroes end up as establishment lackeys, marginalized individuals currying favor with the mainstream by targeting other excluded groups on behalf of the Man.
Twenty-five years ago, though, in 1989 writer Grant Morrison and artist Richard Case began working on Doom Patrol, a comic that ended up telling a different kind of superhero story. Over four years and 44 issues, Morrison, Case, and a number of other fill-in artists inverted the usual connection between heroes and the law.
Read more. [Image: DC]

theatlantic:

Grant Morrison’s Doom Patrol: The Craziest Superhero Story Ever Told

For most superheroes, fighting for truth and justice means fighting for the status quo.  The typical plot: Supervillain(s) attempts to take over the world and/or steal property; superhero(es) stop them.

The journey from disjunction to order is only emphasized by the fact that the heroes are themselves often outsiders in some way. Superman is an immigrant; Batman has a traumatic childhood backstory; the X-Men are policed and persecuted mutants. Yet despite the fact that they are underdogs, the heroes nonetheless fight for the mainstream authorities. Thus superheroes are often fantasies of assimilation—a dream of outsiders being accepted by, or turning into, insiders.

At best, that fantasy offers a promise of acceptance to everyone, making for an inclusive vision of the American dream. At worst, superheroes end up as establishment lackeys, marginalized individuals currying favor with the mainstream by targeting other excluded groups on behalf of the Man.

Twenty-five years ago, though, in 1989 writer Grant Morrison and artist Richard Case began working on Doom Patrol, a comic that ended up telling a different kind of superhero story. Over four years and 44 issues, Morrison, Case, and a number of other fill-in artists inverted the usual connection between heroes and the law.

Read more. [Image: DC]

joshreads:

See, if society accepts that it’s OK to save a parking spot with a chair when it snows, some people are going to decide it’s OK all the time

I always thought that meant, “Free Chair.”

joshreads:

See, if society accepts that it’s OK to save a parking spot with a chair when it snows, some people are going to decide it’s OK all the time

I always thought that meant, “Free Chair.”

No words needed.

No words needed.

The 1974 Safe Drinking Water Act allows every resident of the United States to have access to safe drinking water. So how do we say that, for three hundred thousand people in this part of West Virginia, it’s O.K. to have ‘appropriate’ water? Do we understand the path we’re taking here, by defining two different classes of water, for two different groups of population? Do we really want to go down that path? In the history of this nation, it doesn’t end well when we go down this path.
brucesterling:

*At last

I had the $4,000 one, so this was a big relief.

brucesterling:

*At last

I had the $4,000 one, so this was a big relief.

amischiefofmice:

orfs:

averyterrible:

thisplaceisdespair:

flatluigi:

stormingtheivory:

So can we talk about the absolutely stunning duplicity going on here?

holy shit

ok, why the fuck is the graph upside down. that is incredibly misleading

Because its from the Florida Department of Justice, and they have a mandate here.

for those who have trouble inverting it in their head, ftfy:


this is some of the most blatant twisting of info i have ever seen holy shit

Convincing argument that Stand Your Ground is a blessing for Florida gun deaths.

amischiefofmice:

orfs:

averyterrible:

thisplaceisdespair:

flatluigi:

stormingtheivory:

So can we talk about the absolutely stunning duplicity going on here?

holy shit

ok, why the fuck is the graph upside down. that is incredibly misleading

Because its from the Florida Department of Justice, and they have a mandate here.

for those who have trouble inverting it in their head, ftfy:

image

this is some of the most blatant twisting of info i have ever seen holy shit

Convincing argument that Stand Your Ground is a blessing for Florida gun deaths.