Titivil
Tourists!

Tourists!

Going for it.

Going for it.

Bouillabaisse served.

Bouillabaisse served.

"Autumn Sweater (Kevin Shields Remix)" Yo La Tengo

Bouillabaisse music.

Bouillabaisse Day.

Bouillabaisse Day.

Jesus!

Jesus!

fatmanatee:

hanzobladeofsteel:

I’m not antisocial, I’m just picky about who to be social with

D:

fatmanatee:

hanzobladeofsteel:

I’m not antisocial, I’m just picky about who to be social with

D:

businessweek:

You’ll soon be able to buy Peeps year-round. Here’s how they get made, illustrated using a series of GIFs.

Nightmares.

Just a big old house.

Just a big old house.

theatlantic:

Grant Morrison’s Doom Patrol: The Craziest Superhero Story Ever Told

For most superheroes, fighting for truth and justice means fighting for the status quo.  The typical plot: Supervillain(s) attempts to take over the world and/or steal property; superhero(es) stop them.
The journey from disjunction to order is only emphasized by the fact that the heroes are themselves often outsiders in some way. Superman is an immigrant; Batman has a traumatic childhood backstory; the X-Men are policed and persecuted mutants. Yet despite the fact that they are underdogs, the heroes nonetheless fight for the mainstream authorities. Thus superheroes are often fantasies of assimilation—a dream of outsiders being accepted by, or turning into, insiders.
At best, that fantasy offers a promise of acceptance to everyone, making for an inclusive vision of the American dream. At worst, superheroes end up as establishment lackeys, marginalized individuals currying favor with the mainstream by targeting other excluded groups on behalf of the Man.
Twenty-five years ago, though, in 1989 writer Grant Morrison and artist Richard Case began working on Doom Patrol, a comic that ended up telling a different kind of superhero story. Over four years and 44 issues, Morrison, Case, and a number of other fill-in artists inverted the usual connection between heroes and the law.
Read more. [Image: DC]

theatlantic:

Grant Morrison’s Doom Patrol: The Craziest Superhero Story Ever Told

For most superheroes, fighting for truth and justice means fighting for the status quo.  The typical plot: Supervillain(s) attempts to take over the world and/or steal property; superhero(es) stop them.

The journey from disjunction to order is only emphasized by the fact that the heroes are themselves often outsiders in some way. Superman is an immigrant; Batman has a traumatic childhood backstory; the X-Men are policed and persecuted mutants. Yet despite the fact that they are underdogs, the heroes nonetheless fight for the mainstream authorities. Thus superheroes are often fantasies of assimilation—a dream of outsiders being accepted by, or turning into, insiders.

At best, that fantasy offers a promise of acceptance to everyone, making for an inclusive vision of the American dream. At worst, superheroes end up as establishment lackeys, marginalized individuals currying favor with the mainstream by targeting other excluded groups on behalf of the Man.

Twenty-five years ago, though, in 1989 writer Grant Morrison and artist Richard Case began working on Doom Patrol, a comic that ended up telling a different kind of superhero story. Over four years and 44 issues, Morrison, Case, and a number of other fill-in artists inverted the usual connection between heroes and the law.

Read more. [Image: DC]